New release: Warrior Songs releases third CD, featuring songs by Vietnam vets

The Last Thing We Ever Do:  Vietnam Era Veterans Speak Truth will be officially released on August 8 to coincide with the 57th anniversary of the passage of the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution

Warrior Songs third CD, The Last Thing We Ever Do:  Vietnam Era Veterans Speak Truth, will be officially released on August 8 to coincide with the 57th anniversary of the passage of the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution.  The CD, featuring 14 cuts, is a collaboration of 19 Vietnam vets with 21 professional musicians and songwriters to create an eclectic compilation of rock, jazz, blues, and blue grass-inspired stories of the war and its aftereffects.  The project involved 81 studio musicians and 14 studios in the United States and Vietnam.  A total of 109 artists, 17 of whom are Vietnamese, were involved in creating the CD.  The diversity of musical styles mirrors the diversity of the stories, from the Selective Service System to combat to coping with returning to the U.S., civilian life, and moral injury.  In all, the songs on the CD chart the three stages of war: “going, there, and back.” 

Warrior Songs was founded in 2011 by Iraq War veteran Jason Moon, who, diagnosed with PTSD, attempted suicide.  He began to write songs about his experiences, and in 2010 released the CD Trying to Find My Way Home.  This led to performances at educational sessions for non-vets and veterans’ retreats, which in turn led to vets sharing their stories with him.  He realized that music could be an agency of healing for others if he could transform the stories into songs with the help of professional musicians and songwriters.  He founded Warrior Songs in 2011, and the first CD, If You Have to Ask . . ., with Moon as executive producer, was released in 2016.  The CD Women at War: Warrior Songs Vol. 2 was released in 2018 and represents the first time in the history of modern music that a full length CD was created from the testimony of women veterans.  Eighteen women veterans and two Gold Star family members supplied testimony.  17 songwriters and 64 professional musicians brought the songs to life. 13 engineers, working in recording studios across five states, created the final recordings.  In total, “Warrior Songs Vol. 2: Women at War” was produced by the collaboration of 95 people, of whom 49 were women.  Women at War won the Wisconsin Area Music Award Album of the Year for 2019.

Moon has long-range plans for Warrior Songs.  Volume 4 featuring songs by veterans of color is scheduled for a 2023 release.  Future themes are “Family, Friends, and Support,” “Native and Indigenous Voices,” “Injured and Disabled Veterans,” “Rainbow Warriors/LGBTQ ,” “Tales from the Combat Zone,” and “Women Veterans of Color.”  By 2030 he hopes to release volumes 1 through 10 as a full box set.   A supplementary 11th volume will explore the experiences of survivors of US wars. 

The new CD, as well as volumes 1 and 2, are free for veterans and are available from Warriorsongs.org.

(text by Larry Abbott)

Excerpts from the CD songs (courtesy from Warrior Songs):

Conscription

I’ve seen the war on television, seems so far away.

It could be me there on the screen, could happen any day.

Rice paddies, helicopters, Agent Orange and a jungle trail,

 Body bags and stretchers, all while the mothers wail.

And will they call my name?

 When I learn my fate?

 Will I come home again?

Oh, conscription.

(Lyrics: John Zutz & Danny Proud; Music: Lisa Johnson)

Disquieted Mind

As we burned your reality down

And I would hold you blameless 

If you’d only want me gone 

But I was cold

And you’ve been kind 

And you have kept me warm

And I’m not home

And I’ll never be home again

But I’ll take off my shoes 

And sleep on your floor if you’ll let me in

And I could never blame you

If you want to send me back where I’m from

But if you let me stay here

I can build you something out of my love

Take it or leave it

It’s a trivial gift

But there’s a thing that I’m building

From silence

And a hammer that cracks in the wind

(Jeff Mitchell and Steve Gunn)

“Suicide monologue”. A testimony by Everett Cox

One steamy night, the summer of 1969, at Marble Mt. Air Base near Da Nang in Viet Nam, a rocket exploded near me and I died. There was screaming, explosions, dust, smoke, chaos; I had no torn flesh, no blood in the dust, but I died.

My flesh did not die but I had shattered. In death, I became a ghost. In life, a shadow. The ghost dominated the shadow. That domination has meant self-destructive behavior, an obsession with suicide and suicide attempts. Self destruction. Who, what is self? My body? My heart? My spirit? I had to destroy all that might be self. I had to destroy  self completely, my complete self, even though there was no complete me.

Read full text here

“The Emotions after War in Viet Nam. Poetry from my Reconciliation and Healing Journeys”, by Edward Tick

Seeking the most comprehensive and holistic healing of war wounds possible, I have been leading annual reconciliation journeys to Viet Nam for veterans and other war survivors every year since the twenty-fifth anniversary of the end of the war in 2000. Encounters between survivors of all sides squeeze long-ago memories and feelings out of American and Vietnamese alike. Through poetry I record the voices and stories of women and men who lived through extraordinarily close encounters during war and again on meeting today. These encounters show the depths and complexities of our emotional lives during times of warfare and its aftermath when we can transform fear and hatred into understanding, compassion and love.

Read Ed’s poems here

Dòng suối quê hương (The Streams of Our Native Land): a poem by Trần Đình Song

Dear readers of Close Encounters in War, we are delighted to publish another poetic contribution about the Vietnam war, this time from the perspective of a Vietnamese veteran: Trần Đình Song, who served in the Southern Vietnamese Air Force and was in the re-education forced labour camps after the war. This beautiful poem was written in 1966, and although the horror of civil war war haunted the Author and his country, his words are full of love and hope. We publish the poem in its original version, accompanied by the new English translation that the Author made with his friend and member of the CEIWJ Editorial Board Edward Tick.

Dòng suối quê hương (The Streams of Our Native Land), by Trần Đình Song

New publication: “Community, Diversity and Reconciliation in Remote Vietnamese Villages” by Edward Tick

Survive & Thrive: A Journal for Medical Humanities and Narrative as Medicine, 5, 2 (2020)

Meeting with the non-combatant Pioneer Women and Men who worked the
dangerous and heavily bombed Ho Chi Minh Trail during the war. The author is sitting next to Tran Dinh Song, a southern air force veteran; Kate Dahlstedt, therapist, is standing behind.

ABSTRACT

The American War in Viet Nam created
significant divisions among their population. Factions include southern Army of
the Republic of Viet Nam (ARVN) veterans, northern People’s Republic or North
Vietnamese Army (NVA) veterans, Viet Cong (VC)veterans who were essentially
militia, non-combatant Pioneers – largely women, Agent Orange victims. All
these are now treated as one people, one family. Some government prejudice and
denial of benefits remains toward ARVN vets, but as we will see not among the
common people. We turn to our American experiences in the Viet Nam of today of
otherness, differentness, moral responsibility for the war, the possibilities of
reconciliation between former foes. How do the Vietnamese experience us? And
what is our experience of being the outsiders from our country that formerly
invaded this land?

Download the open-access article as PDF for free HERE.

Poet, author, psychotherapist and international activist and guide, Edward Tick,
Ph.D., (www.edwardtick.com) is author of four nonfiction books, including War
and the Soul, and two volumes of poetry. A specialist in war and trauma healing
and the cultures of Viet Nam and Greece, Ed uses the humanities, literature,
cross-cultural and ancient psycho-spiritual-cultural practices for healing.

Close encounters in war: Poetry

We present in this section a collection of poetical contributions that explore the topic of the close encounter in war.

Peter Yeomans: Two Poems (June 4, 2021)

Scott Casey: You died today (May 4, 2021)

Kate Dahlstedt: Sentry (April 21, 2021)

Humberto Ak’abal: Selected poems from In the Courtyard of the Moon (Tia Chucha Press, 2021) (March 26, 2021)

Edward Tick: The Emotions after War in Viet Nam. Poetry from my Reconciliation and Healing Journeys (March 17, 2021)

Yoav Ben Yosef: Smol Yameen (March 9, 2021)

Trần Đình Song: Dòng suối quê hương (The Streams of Our Native Land) (February 22, 2021)

Charles “Sandy” Scull and Brent “Mac” MacKinnon: Selected poetry and prose by Sandy Scull and Brent MacKinnon from the volume Agent Orange Roundup. Living with a Foot in Two Worlds (Bookstand Publishing, 2020) (December 27, 2020)

Edward Tick: Selected poetry and prose by Edward Tick (December 27, 2020)